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Forensic Methodology symposium

Monday, March 30th
4:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Brownie’s Cafe, 100 Avery Hall
Columbia University

Schedule
4:00 PM Opening remarks by Dean Amale Andraos and Janette Kim

4:20 PM Practice in Research
Orit Halpern, New School for Social Research and Lang College
Hod Lipson, Cornell University Creative Machines Lab
Leah Meisterlin, moderator, Barnard+Columbia Architecture; Office:MG

6:00 PM Research in Practice
Andres Jaque, GSAPP; Office for Political Innovation
Michael Sorkin, CCNY Urban Design; Michael Sorkin Studio
Susanne Schindler, moderator, GSAPP; Buell Center

7:20 PM Summary discussion moderated by Diana Martinez
7:40 PM Reception

How does architectural research work?

The development of a research methodology might be understood as a complex editing process; methods are unstable and adaptive, evolving in response to changing conditions and findings. Tools and techniques that were formerly reliable and productive may suddenly seem ill-fitting or obsolete. Unexpected results may challenge assumptions and force the construction of new regimes for gathering knowledge. Any particular methodology, therefore, is defined both for and by the research.

In well-known cases such as the physical experiments of Frei Otto or Antoni Gaudi, the field studies of Venturi, Scott-Brown, and Izenour, or the computational analysis of MVRDV or Mark Burry – among many other examples – methods appear crucial to the performance of the research. But what is their role? How are they constructed and used?

This symposium invites a diverse group of influential researchers to open their methodology to critical examination and discussion. By focusing on the how rather than the what of their particular research practices, we hope to better understand the agency of research in architecture as well as its impact on other fields of knowledge.

Hosted by Dean Amale Andraos and the Applied Research Practices in Architecture (ARPA) initiative at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP). ARPA 2015 members: Janette Kim (Director), Diana Martinez (Instructor), Esteban de Backer, David I. Hecht, Alejandro Stein and Mike Che-Wei Yeh.

ARPA Open House

Wednesday, November 6, 2013 from 1-2pm
200 North Buell Hall

ARPA supports students in the development of independent, applied research projects. For the first time starting fall 2014, graduating students from AAD, AUD, MArch, UP, HP, and RED programs can apply, and are eligible to receive fellowships. Join us to learn more.

Apply: Conflicts of Interest

Friday, April 26, 2013
2:00pm, 200 Fayerweather, Columbia GSAPP

More on the GSAPP events calendar.

David Gissen, California College of the Arts
Thomas Keenan, Bard College
Janette Kim, Columbia University GSAPP
Mpho Matsipa, University of Witwatersand
Sarah Whiting, Rice School of Architecture
Mabel Wilson, Columbia University GSAPP
Kazys Varnelis, Columbia University GSAPP
Mark Wasiuta, Columbia University GSAPP

Organized by Advanced Architectural Research

This event will be the first in a series of symposia investigating the role of applied research in architecture. Nestled in an intersection between practice and theory, applied architectural research can potentially work as a space for overlap and negotiation. This event will formally make explicit the opportunities for architectural research to bridge the gap between the archive and the laboratory. Taking advantage of the diversity in the research being tackled by the students of the AAR, a series of specific experts related to each topic will be invited to present and discuss their work. This annual event will continue to critically engage the question: What is applied research in architecture?

The event will be organized as a series of conversations—five distinctive panels—discussing the limits of applied research in contemporary practices and academia. After a brief presentation, each guest will engage in dialogue with a faculty member to develop further insights into their specific zones of research: architectural pedagogy, new forms of urbanity, historic reconstruction and the political context of the humanities. The final panel will map the various conflicts of interests between the four guests in a roundtable discussion—moderated by the director of the Advanced Architectural Research program.

Event Introduction by Mabel Wilson

What is applied research in architectural pedagogy?
A brief presentation by Sara Whiting, Rice School of Architecture,
followed by a conversation with Reinhold Martin,
Introduced by Ernesto Silva, AAR ‘13

What is applied research in the context of a changing city?
A brief presentation by Mpho Matsipa, University of Witwatersand,
followed by a conversation with Janette Kim,
Introduced by Emanuel Admassu, AAR ‘13

What is applied research in reconstructing the past?
A brief presentation by David Gissen, California College of the Arts,
followed by a conversation with Kazys Varnellis,
Introduced by Carolina Ihle, AAR ‘13

Can applied research account for what is outside of systems?
A brief presentation by Thomas Keenan, Bard College,
followed by a conversation with Mark Wasiuta,
Presented by Lluis Alexandre Casanovas, AAR ‘13

Roundtable discussion
Thomas Keenan, David Gissen, Mpho Matsipa and Sara Whiting, moderated by Mabel Wilson




Advanced Architectural Research Part 2.0

Monday, February 8, 2010
Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall

GSAPP’s Lab Directors will discuss new directions in architectural research.

Phil Anzalone, Fabrication Lab; Janette Kim + Kate Orff, Urban Landscape Lab; Toru Hasegawa, Cloud Lab; Sarah Williams, Spatial Information Lab and Moderated by Mathan Ratinam, Moving Image Lab. Organized by Mabel Wilson for the Advanced Architectural Research Program, GSAPP.

Advancing Architectural Research

Wednesday, February 9, 2009
Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall

With GSAPP Professors / Lab Directors
David Benjamin, Living Architecture Lab
Jeffrey Inaba, C-Lab
Jeffrey Johnson, China Lab
Laura Kurgan, Spatial Information Design Lab
Scott Marble, Fabrication Lab
Moderated by Kazys Varnelis, Network Architecture Lab

Organized by Mabel O. Wilson
Advanced Architectural Research, GSAPP